Tips for Removing Scleral Lenses

Updated: May 23


Tips for removing scleral lenses: As a new scleral lens wearer, do you run into problems removing your scleral lenses? Dr. Morrison has some quick tips to help you remove your lenses properly.

  • The most important thing to remember is that you are learning a new skill, and it will take some time and effort to perfect it. Give yourself time and space to practice each day, and give yourself short breaks if you not successful right away. You WILL get the hang of it!

  • To start, use your fingers to gently press against your eyelashes to hold your eyelids out of the way, as seen in the image above. Make sure you can see the entire colored portion (the iris) of your eyes before you attempt to remove your lens.

  • Here's a step-by-step breakdown of how to safely open your eye wide enough as pictured above: 1. Look down, 2. Use the side of your index finger to secure your upper eye lid, 3. Then look up, 4. Use side of your thumb to secure your lower eyelid.

  • Using your scleral plunger, bring it to your eye AT AN ANGLE as seen in the picture above. The cup of the plunger will rest just below the pupil on the lower part of your eye. Make sure to avoid putting the plunger directly on the center of the eye, which will cause too much suction.

  • If you find you have too much suction (maybe you put the plunger in the middle of the lens by accident), take your two fingers and squeeze just below the cup of the plunger to release the plunger from the lens (you’ll hear a little “click” sound when it releases). Watch a short video on this here.

  • If you’re having a hard time using the plunger, you can take out the scleral lens you can use your finger on the bottom part of the lens to gently push up on the lens, creating an air bubble that will break the suction and enable you to remove your lens! Watch a short video on this here.

Don't hesitate to let us know if you need more training with insertion and/or removal of your lenses, especially if you are experiencing redness and irritation. Remember that all new skills take time to perfect, but they soon become second nature. Most learning curves take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks; with regular practice, you will be removing your lenses without a second thought.


Follow us on Instagram for tips, tutorials, and case studies!


18 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All